programme-top-birdwatching-2programme-top-birdwatching-2

IE Web Conference | 8-11 May 2020 | #iecon20

Title: Between living local tradition and the museum – can heritage interpretation put out the fire? 
Type of contribution: 25 min presentation
First presenter: Tomasz Adamski
Country: Poland
Organisation, Job Title: Malopolska Institute of Culture in Kraków

The presentation is focused on a case study of the town of Alwernia in southern Poland, where a collection of memorabilia created by the local voluntary fire brigade is being transformed into a formal Museum. The assemblage of the old fire brigade's trucks, equipment and documents is now to be put into new premises and presented in a new way. The process uncovered various tensions and different perspectives on heritage. Can the indigenous, bottom-up initiative of the voluntary firefighters’ movement be integrated with the approach of museum custodians? In what way can these two, somewhat different, visions of how local heritage contributes to the comprehensive idea of the new museum? 
Experts from Malopolska Institute of Culture in Kraków are taking part in the project in Alwernia, conducting a set of workshops designed to comprehend the main stakeholders’ positions and to help to develop a unified interpretive strategy. 

Title: Collaborative research and facilitation of community engagement with grassroots initiatives in Greece.
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Aris Anagnostopoulos
Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: The Heritage Management Organization
Co-presenter:     Eleni Stefanou
Summary: One of the characteristics of the Greek economic crisis is the proliferation of grassroots initiatives that aim to safeguard or manage cultural heritage. Heritage management in Greece has been the province of state institutions or associations that have addressed community engagement in terms of outreach and audience-building. The blooming of such initiatives echoes a demand for greater participation in decision making, and may prove to be a sign of a burgeoning civil society, wedged between the state and its citizens, in a heritage sector increasingly dominated by market forces. Most of the groups active in Greece, however, have little knowledge of other similar groups. Thus, HERITAGE is setting up a combined research and facilitation project, in collaboration with Elefsina, the Cultural Capital of Europe 2021, which started with the 6th HERMA conference (Elefsina, 5-6/12/2019) where representatives from each group were invited in two days of lectures, activities and workshops.


Title: Community engagement in heritage interpretation
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop

First presenter: Aris Anagnostopoulos
Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: The Heritage Management Organization
Co-presenter:     Eleni Stefanou
Summary: The workshop ‘Community engagement in heritage interpretation’ aims to create a practitioner-based inventory of good practices and examples from the field in order to help projects in their early stages as well as seasoned heritage managers to engage communities better in the process of heritage interpretation. It is the initial part of a research project on community engagement in Europe, based on actual examples from the field.


Title: 'Behind the scenes' visits to foster heritage interpretation community-peer learning
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Yael Bamberger
Country: Israel
Organisation, Job Title: The Council for Conservation of Heritage Sites in Israel
Co-presenter:     Eyal Mitrani
Summary: The Interpret IL community in Israel was established in 2016 by the leading heritage organizations in the country. One of the ways to foster the new community are the 'Behind the Scenes' visits. Every year, there is a call for sites to host a three-hour visit to their site and present their ways of interpretation. The monthly tours enable professions from all over the country to take part in peer-learning opportunities.  The host-site team presents their ways of interpretation according to a focussed set of questions which are based on the ICOMOS Charter for the Interpretation and Presentation of Cultural Heritage Sites. Professional discussions through the tour foster collaboration and provide the host site with an opportunity to have constructive feedback. Both the host-site teams and the visiting professionals learn about interpretation through that peer learning. Both groups define this opportunity as 'a gift'.

Title: Geo-interpretation as support for increasing the recognition of the Karavanke – Karawanken UNESCO Global Geopark
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Mojca Bedjanič
Country: Slovenia
Organisation, Job Title: Institute of the Republic of Slovenia for Nature Conservation
Co-presenter:     Darja Komar, Gerald Hartmann, Simona Kaligarič, Andreja Senegačnik, Milan Piko, Lenka Stermecki, Antonia Weissenbacher
Summary: In 2011, the Karavanke – Karawanken UNESCO Global Geopark was established in the cross-border area of Slovenia and Austria. So far, interpretation infrastructure (information centres, routes, interpretation points, exhibitions etc) has been set up, and Geopark management structure has been established. Last year, we were faced with the new challenge of how to present exceptional geological, natural and cultural heritage to the general public, to the visitors and also to local people to impress them, while ensuring its proper protection. We implemented IE training for future geo-interpreters, where they acquired basic skills in the field of heritage interpreting. This year we shall provide additional training, focused on expert content. We believe that quality interpretation requires knowledge of the basics of interpretation as well as of expert contents. We actively involve geo-interpreters in newly emerging stories which makes them more aware of their home environment’s heritage and importance of preserving it. Consequently, the value of the Geopark Karawanken - Karavanke is increasing and it is becoming even more recognised in the local environment.


Title: ‘24 hours with the Mura River’: conservation of natural and cultural heritage in the UNESCO MAB Mura River Biosphere Reserve
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation or poster
First presenter: Mojca Bedjanič
Country: Slovenia
Organisation, Job Title: Institute of the Republic of Slovenia for Nature Conservation
Co-presenter:     Andreja Senegačnik, Simona Kaligarič, Lenka Stermecki, 
Summary: The Mura River is the last large Slovenian lowland river with at least partly-preserved natural river dynamics. Along the river, the Biosphere Reserve was declared under the UNESCO MAB programme in 2018, as part of the five-national transboundary Mura-Drava-Danube Biosphere Reserve. To increase the awareness and importance of outstanding natural and cultural heritage and its conservation among local people, five years ago we organized the ‘24 hours with the Mura River’ event for the first time. Its objective is to gather a group of lay people, local people, professionals and volunteers in a 24-hour event to co-create the programme, to influence behaviour positively and to raise awareness on the area's heritage and its preservation. Programme-providers present topics with different approaches and means by conducting workshops, guided interpretive walks, area explorations, storytelling, dramatic staging and exhibitions. In 2019, 1000 participants, mainly local people and school children along the Mura, as well as 81 different programme providers from different societies and institutions, participated in the event.


Title: Cooperative techniques for building a community for heritage interpretation
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Eva Birkás
Country: Hungary
Organisation, Job Title: Museum of Fine Arts Budapest

Summary: In 2017 I delivered a course on museum education at the University of Pécs, Hungary, which focused on the ancient Roman heritage of the town and the county. The classes took the form of project-oriented learning and were conducted in the exhibition ’Sopianae’ in the Janus Pannonius Museum which displays Roman finds from the region. The aim of the project was to develop a programme for elementary school children through which they can get acquainted with the ancient origins of their hometown in a way that is both entertaining and edifying. The students worked in groups on the project and I facilitated their work through cooperative techniques. On the last occasion, a 5th grade class (11-year-old children) visited the museum from a local school and tested the programme conducted by university students. This way students, children and teachers formed a community for interpreting local heritage.


Title: Hospitable interpretive hosts: Interpretation for the tourism trade community (IE training taster)
Type of contribution: 55 min interactive workshop
First presenter: Kristian Bjørnstad
Country: Norway
Organisation, Job Title: Norske Parker - Norwegian Parks Association
Co presenter    Sandy Colvine (France)
Summary: Natural and cultural heritage is the lifeblood of many dedicated professionals working in tourism and hospitality, such as parks, destination management companies and tourism businesses. Many live and breathe their passion and expertise, whether it be arts, crafts or local food. Yet, it’s not always easy to hit the right note and communicate your enthusiasm to visitors and the local community, to release that added value. Others may simply not know how to deal with local heritage and turn to easy mainstream products and services. 
IE’s course for Certified Interpretive Hosts uses collective, hands-on activities to help tourism professionals connect with local heritage, tap into the value of deeper meanings for their businesses, forge synergies and reinforce their roles as key players in wider heritage communities. 
This workshop gives you the opportunity to try out some of these activities and share ideas on how this course could be promoted and delivered in your regions / countries.


Title: Augmented reality and gamification elements for multi-perspective, interpretive apps  
Type of contribution: 25 min presentation
First presenter: Anna Chatel

Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: University of Education Freiburg

Summary: Smartphones provide enormous resources for learning about our local environment. We can see phenomena from different perspectives, for example through the eyes of different stakeholders, or update the environment with augmented reality. Gamification elements can make this learning process for some target groups even more attractive. At the moment, there are more and more different tools coming onstream to create your own app very easily. 
With students, we have developed innovative outdoor interpretation apps for the public. Evaluations showed us clearly that exploring und interpreting your environment and communicating the findings to others via apps can contribute to multi-perspective thinking. 
We show the process of generating apps and present some empirical research projects to learn how effective the implementation of smartphone apps is for outdoor interpretation. 


Title: Fostering heritage communities with the Life Beyond Tourism: the travel to dialogue movement 
Type of contribution: 25 min presentation
First presenter: Corinna Del Bianco

Country: Italy
Organisation, Job Title: Fondazione Romualdo Del Bianco, Istituto Internazionale Life Beyond Tourism
Co presenter    Carlotta Del Bianco
Summary: The Life Beyond Tourism – Travel to Dialogue Movement LBT-TTD is the practical application of the research developed over the years by the experts at the Romualdo Del Bianco Foundation. This is dedicated to local communities, particularly of World Heritage Sites; it includes a set of practical tools for the full awareness of WHS’ residents and for the enhancement of their local heritage and cultural expressions as elements of dialogue, therefore knowledge, appreciation of the diversity and respect for other cultures.
The LBT-TTD orientation is supported by a ‘certification system’, an educational offer, a cultural and commercial offer with new ethics, scientific events and publications. 
LBT-TTD was shared with ICOMOS at the 2008GA in Quebec, the 2014GA in Florence (Resolutions 1 and 42/2014), with ICOMOS ISC Theophilos and two UNESCO WHC sessions in Manama 2018 and Baku 2019. It is developed yearly at the Building Peace Through Heritage Forum in Florence.


Title: Creating agonistic (third) spaces through heritage interpretation heritage communities
Type of contribution: 55 min presentation
First presenter: Nicole Deufel
Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: Managing Director, vhs Aalen
Co presenter    
Summary: The Third Space (Bhabha 1994) as a concept for democratizing cultural practice is gaining traction in the arts, library and education sectors across Europe. Combined with the ideas of agonistics (Mouffe 2013) as a political practice, the Third Space envisaged as an agonistic public space also has relevance for the heritage sector. In particular, agonistic (third) spaces provide heritage interpretation with the flexibility required to represent the values of diverse heritage communities and enable the constructive negotiation of new heritages and related practices. This latter aspect is becoming increasingly important in societies that change through migrations. The presentation outlines the theoretical concepts of agonistics and Third Space theory and examines the implications of their application to heritage interpretation with and for diverse heritage communities. 


Title: A little piece of paradise: interpreting a ‘heritage’ holiday community at Scandretts Bay.
Type of contribution: 25 min presentation
First presenter: Michelle Edge
Country: New Zealand
Organisation, Job Title: Auckland Council
Co presenter    
Summary: The Scandrett family arrived in 1864 at a bay 74 kilometres north of Auckland and established a farm and orchard there. After WWII, the Scandretts rented beach-front sites to holiday makers. They created a private and idiosyncratic holiday community of around 80 families. This ‘heritage community’ thrived and flourished for 50 years. 
The Scandretts sold their property in 1999 and it was transformed into a regional park. The farm buildings and homestead were restored and three holiday cottages were retained. 
This presentation will focus on the composition and character of the holiday community (now gone) and our interpretation of it. The harvesting of stories and photos from the Scandretts and the cottage owners has culminated in interpretation including videos, interactive photos, an audio, signage, displays and a booklet.
Notions of community, valuing vernacular architecture and ideas for repurposing heritage buildings are discussed as part of this presentation.

Title: Architecture and heritage interpretation
Type of contribution: 25 min presentation
First presenter: Angus Forbes
Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: Freelance
Co presenter    
Summary: We are familiar with the picture of heritage interpretation as a 'trialogue' among the guide, visitors and the site. It's easy to forget that quite often the site itself has already been interpreted by an architect or landscape architect who not only helps to secure and control visitors' access to the site but also modifies their experience of it. Certain aspects are prioritised and views or connections configured. Often, alterations are made to the substance itself. There may have been a participation process in which the public have influenced the site – and it may have influenced them. So significant interpretation work has already taken place before the guides, the panels and the visitors have arrived on site! Let's take a critical look at the interpretive work of architects and landscape architects. How can a site be made to ‘speak' to visitors both individually and collectively and how can architects help visitors and locals to make their own connections with the site? 
 

Title: (R)Evolution: volunteer-led LGBTQ tours at the British Museum
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Stuart Frost
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: Head of Interpretation
British Museum
Co presenter    
Summary: The British Museum’s collection is global in scope, ranging from deep history to the present day. It is a national museum with a worldwide presence and a diverse, predominantly international, audience. The Museum impacts upon many different types of communities in a myriad of ways. This paper focuses on recent initiatives to meaningful interpret LGBTQ histories for local, national and international publics. These approaches have involved new ways of working for the British Museum, internally for staff and volunteers, and externally with community partners. This paper will focus on new volunteer-led LGBTQ tours of the collection which began during July 2019 to mark the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall Riots. The intention is that these free LGBTQ tours become increasingly directed by the volunteers themselves, and that they drive change internally with positive benefits for staff and volunteers alike.

Title: Translations must be elegant, not just faithful
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Michael H Glen
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: 
Co presenter    Elena Weber (Russia)
Summary: Well-written or well-spoken text enhances interpretive experiences. Good translation of text helps interpretation to be meaningful and boosts a heritage’s community’s sense of fulfilment.
A translator is a mediator between people speaking different languages. In heritage interpretation, it is cross-cultural as well as cross-lingual mediation. The translator’s goal must be to render the meaning expressed in one language into another language by creating text that is ‘communicatively equal’.
In translatology, there is neither good nor bad translation, but rather ‘equivalent’ and ‘adequate’ translation. ‘Equivalent’ translation preserves the semantic identity of source and target texts while ‘adequate’ translation preserves the meaning and intent of the source text in the target text. 
H G Gadamer said that translation, like all interpretation, is a highlighting process, defining the common ground between text in two languages. Translation of interpretive text is interpretation in itself.


Title: More than just a hobby: is re-enactment interpretation for everyone?    
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation    
First presenter: Ingo Roland Glueckler    
Country: Austria    
Organisation, Job Title: Diocesan und University Library of the Catholic University of Linz (DUB) / IMTAL Europe
    
Co presenter        
Summary: Individuals and institutions alike are equally engaged in the use of live interpretation and theatrical techniques for educational, interpretive and programmatic purposes in museums, historic places and other informal learning institutions. Since the Faro Convention ‘encourage[s] everyone to participate in the process of […] interpretation’ (Art. 12a), some dedicated volunteer re-enactors from heritage communities have become increasingly aware of the function of live interpretation and museum theatre as a means of heritage interpretation and meaning-making for everyone. Although a few do first-person interpretation, the majority opt for third-person. As a result, they have limited interpretive contact with the public and have no active involvement of visitors. In this talk, we are going to explore whether re-enactment from volunteers, special interest groups and independent citizen-led initiative groups, fits in with the concept of cultural heritage interpretation.    The presentation is grounded on the premise that museums are communication media with a particular communicational role determined by the exhibition team. Museums frequently try to engage people with an understanding of the past using personal narratives as the most effective tools thereby evoking emotional responses to the exhibition. It is, therefore, important to realize these narratives depend on various types of media (texts, photographs, charts, audio-video material etc) and their mutual relationship in the museum space. If developed properly, they can contribute to the understanding of the past and, if not, they can undermine the interpretive efforts and lead to misinterpretation and misrepresentation. The focus of the presentation is on the Croatian Memorial Museum in Jasenovac and the Slovenian Contemporary History Museum in Celje which illustrate (possible) controversies related to national identities raised by different interpretation media. 
Title: To whom does Narva belong?
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Maria Hansar
Country: Estonia
Organisation, Job Title: Tallinn University
Co presenter    
Summary: Narva, a town with a complex history, is a testbed for our locative mobile media prototype development where different memory communities are invited to experience the multiplicity of layers of the town’s history and to contribute to the regeneration of their own city. The inclusion processes of the citizens for urban regeneration of the historical centre, have been challenging. We aim to direct people to discover and to use content from the digital archives for asking questions and finding answers about the city’s invisible past and present. We want to combine locative mobile media with linked cultural data in order to create a new interpretive semantic space, crossing the contextual boundaries of different media content and increase the capacity of historical landscapes to be opened for a multitude of narratives and an endless number of paths for the future, as an alternative to the nostalgia for a ‘golden age’ or to the tendencies of museumification of historical cities.

Title: The World Heritage Site Erzgebirge Krušnohoří Mining Region: a catalyst for local empowerment
Type of contribution: 55 min presentation
First presenter: Friederike Hansell

Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: Transcultural Studies (MA)
Heidelberg University
Co presenter    
Summary: Located in the Ore Mountains, the German-Czech World Heritage Site of Erzgebirge / Krušnohoří Mining Region can be considered as an exemplar for fostering community involvement. The World Heritage Site touches a broad range of stakeholders and interested groups including a number of volunteer associations. Therefore, from the outset, a participatory approach was chosen to create a shared responsibility and understanding of the heritage values among favourable as well as critical stakeholders and to encourage active participation in the nomination process and future management of the site. To achieve this, a number of activities took place to address various expectations and needs. The site was inscribed on the World Heritage List in July 2019, after almost 20 years of preparation, and the nomination process provided a framework for the empowerment of local communities. It was also the driving force for bringing together the people in the region and for fostering the dialogue between the various stakeholders.


Title: Conversation Starters: creative solutions for opening-up a dialogue with community audiences
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Deborah Hodson

Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: Imagemakers Design and Consulting Ltd
Co presenter    Philip Songhurst
Summary: The Faro Convention acknowledges the need 'to involve everyone in society in defining and managing cultural heritage'. Increasingly, museums and heritage sites are adopting a co-creative, participatory approach to achieve this, but how do you start the conversation and ensure your approach to interpretation is inclusive? How can you make sure everyone’s voice is heard? 
The trigger for Conversation Starters is the notion that whilst we are aware that diverse audiences have different ideas and opinions, and are committed to listening to and involving them, we often have no idea how to begin.
In this interactive workshop, we will provide participants with ideas and tools for starting conversations with their communities and putting them on the road to establishing meaningful dialogue and co-creation. With examples of best practice, tips and activities, they will take away a practical toolkit of ideas on how to involve everyone in interpreting their heritage.

Title: Fostering active citizenship through heritage interpretation: the Istra Inspirit project 
Type of contribution: 55 min presentation
First presenter: Manuela Hrvatin
Country: Croatia
Organisation, Job Title: Interpret Croatia
Co presenter    
Summary: Istra Inspirit is an example of best practice in heritage interpretation in the Istria Region (Croatia) – a project that finds innovative ways of involving different stakeholders in the cultural tourism industry in order to create unforgettable experiences and true heritage interpretation. The participants will get a chance to hear first-hand experiences from the leader of this multi-awarded project and get to know which are the challenges (and solutions) when it comes to involving the local community into heritage interpretation.
Through gamification, storytelling, living history performances and many other heritage interpretation methods, Istra Inspirit revives numerous Istrian myths, legends, stories and traditions. But one thing is always a must – to include the local community and, in that way, help better understanding of the heritage values. The process isn't always easy, but it's necessary to achieve quality heritage presentation and sustainability. Learn how!
 

Title: Hamernia – urn problems into solutions: a negotiation team game about local heritage
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Piotr Idziak
Country: Poland
Organisation, Job Title: Malopolska Institute of Culture in Kraków
Co presenter    Sebastian Wacięga PhD
Summary: At our workshop we`ll play simulation game, created in the Malopolska Institute of Culture in Kraków. The game is designed for groups, to develop civic competences and consciousness of social context of local heritage and issues of its protection. ‘Hamernia’ is a game of negotiations, playing roles and creating solutions. Players included community members from the city of Zakopane. This popular tourist destination in Poland is located just at the edge of the Tatra National Park. It suffers from over-tourism and social tensions – rich local tradition and devotion to values meet global trends and problems here. The players in groups are provided with challenges, inspired by real events, and they have to create solutions. They play the roles of local stakeholders. They have to be conscious about different points of view and be able to clarify their judgements.
The game is followed by the school project programme in which students research and discuss real problems connected with local heritage. 


Title: The cultural park as a form of cultural heritage protection in Poland
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Emilia Janeczko
Country: Poland
Organisation, Job Title: Warsaw University of Life Sciences
Co presenter    Małgorzata Woźnicka
Summary: Landscape is part of the natural and cultural heritage of society. It affects people's quality of life and plays an important role in various areas of public life from culture to ecology and social affairs. In Poland, one of the forms of cultural landscape protection and preservation of distinctive areas, with immovable monuments characteristic of the local building and settlement traditions, are cultural parks. The history of cultural parks in Poland dates back about 20 years. The social understanding of the need to create them, as can be seen from the analysis of planning documents, is considerable, especially among planners, local government officials and politicians. On the other hand, among the general public, knowledge about cultural parks, the objectives of their creation and the principles of their operation, seems insufficient – as evidenced by pilot studies conducted among students of the Warsaw University of Life Sciences.


Title: Engaging heritage communities by citizen science: considerations, experiences and lessons learnt
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Michael Jungmeier
Country: Austria
Organisation, Job Title: Professor of Nature Conservation and Sustainability
Co presenter    Anneliese Fuchs
Summary: The diversified formats of citizen science provide new possibilities for initiating heritage communities. The authors understand the conference theme in a broad sense and follow the concept of citizen science as advocated by Dickinson and Bonney (2012). 
The focus is on three citizen science projects in Austria that have had an impact on diverse communities. The annual Geo-Day of Nature works with lay researchers which not only significantly increases species records, but also creates an active and supportive community. The project flora@velden.eu investigates and discusses native and non-native plants with pupils in the context of human migration. Game of Clones is a strategy game for site management that was developed with scientists and students. 
These experiences suggest that the involvement in scientific activities can trigger the identification of a community with a certain topic, question or site. Lively communities need a purpose and the contribution to science can be one. 


Title: Exploring changing neighbourhoods: urban games as a participatory archive 
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Jekaterina Lavrinec
Country: Lithuania
Organisation, Job Title: Vilnius Gediminas Technical University
Co presenter    
Summary: Considering games as a form of creative collective action, I shall explore the potential of urban games in fostering communities and re-shaping the image of shrinking historical neighbourhoods. In my paper / presentation, I shall show that urban games function as an alternative system of navigation in urban space. Drawing upon the concept of mental mapping (K. Lynch), urban games are considered to be a tool for developing new spatial links or routes within the urban areas. Depending on the design of a game, it can encourage attentive exploration of the elements and details of the neighbourhoods. In this way, urban games can be used as an open participatory archive which is not only played but also co-developed by residents and visitors. Urban games are instrumental in co-developing the shared vision of the place. In this paper, I shall present the experience of the laboratory of urban games and research – Laimikis.lt – in launching an urban game, Urbingo, as an open archive for historical sites.

Title: Meanings of ‘meaning’ – and why they matter
Type of contribution: 55 min. presentation
First presenter: Patrick Lehnes
Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: University of Freiburg
Co presenter    
Summary: Interpretation ‘is an educational activity which aims to reveal meanings and relationships’. Freeman Tilden’s definition of interpretation from 1957 already refers to meanings. This has not changed. Meaning is still considered a central concept in the field of heritage interpretation. But do we really have a clear understanding of what ‘meaning’ means?
‘Meaning’ is a concept which is not easy to grasp or to explain. The DELPHI project uses a conceptual framework which includes different types of meaning such as ‘literal meaning’, ‘associated meanings’ and ‘figurative meaning’. All these aspects of meaning are important for meaning-making, that is for interpretation.
A clearer understanding of meaning-making may help heritage interpreters to contribute to enhancing ‘respect for diversity of interpretations’ and – at the same time – helping to ‘establish processes for conciliation (...) where contradictory values are placed on the same cultural heritage’ (Article 7 of the Faro convention).

Title: UNESCO learning concepts and heritage interpretation    
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation    
First presenter: Thorsten Ludwig    
Country: Germany    
Organisation, Job Title: Interpret Europe    
        
Co presenter        
Summary: Trends of past decades triggered a critical review of the interpretive profession including:
• the rise of heritage communities that strengthen the involvement of local people
• the shift from experts interpreting for people to facilitators enabling people to interpret
• the search for purpose, including changes from materialist to post-materialist values
Most of those trends consider the way that values are introduced in order to ensure peaceful development towards a more sustainable future. Interpretation organisations seek to integrate this idea into their training programmes.
This suggests taking a closer look at the learning programmes of UNESCO. UNESCO’s mission is to build peace through international cooperation but also to support learning at natural and cultural heritage sites.
The paper describes how UNESCO concepts can contribute to the development of heritage interpretation and how heritage interpretation might support learning experiences at UNESCO-designated heritage.    


Title: Minus us, it’s your white elephant: Old Bulawayo and the challenges of community participation
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter
    Lesley Hatipone Machiridza

Country: Zimbabwe
Organisation, Job Title: Great Zimbabwe University
Co presenter    
Summary: Heritage in its various facets is constructed in magnanimous and complex ways. Oftentimes, indigenous communities generate the bulk of paraphernalia and narratives that give life to heritage resources. Instead of becoming the champions of heritage development, ‘heritage experts’ systematically relegate these players to the peripheries. In Zimbabwe, the disenfranchisement of local communities from their heritage places is well pronounced and deep-rooted. The colonial legacy continues to undermine the role of local communities in heritage management and interpretation. While heritage experts in the country believe their working relations with locals are smooth, the reverse actually holds true. Out of incessant frustration and anger caused by these experts, some locals have resorted to either site vandalism or complete neglect of their heritage resources. This paper explores Old Bulawayo which was mysteriously gutted by a veld fire amidst prolonged wrangles with local communities.

Title: Storyhunters and storytellers: the case of a local heritage community in the village of Kacwin, Poland.    
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation    
First presenter: Dominika Mietelska-Jarecka
    
Country: Poland    
Organisation, Job Title: Malopolska Institute of Culture in Kraków    
Co presenter    Małgorzata Rapacz    
Summary: People tell stories and so do institutions. As a cultural institution, we interpret and share the stories of our region. For 22 years, we have organized the Malopolska Days of Cultural Heritage during which it is possible to visit selected heritage sites, mostly little known or not open to the public. To create the program, we have become storyhunters, doing fieldwork, searching for specialists and digging up archives. We have also connected with local communities to evoke the stories that do not fit our interpretive frames but are meaningful to people. The need for capturing those stories gave life to a new programme and a new paradigm. Instead of using the local perspective on heritage as a support for our stories, we wanted to become a support for the local heritage communities to tell their story. This is how we ended up in Kacwin, a little village that was visited in the 1990s by a photographer from Kraków. We want to share a story of his return to Kacwin in 2019 and its impact on the community.     


Title: Heimat museums and the 21st Century    
Type of contribution: 55 min. presentation    
First presenter: Nigel Mills    
Country: UK    
Organisation, Job Title: Nigel Mills Heritage    
Co presenter        
Summary: The German concept of ‘Heimat’ is deeply rooted in a community’s sense of place and belonging. Heimat museums are normally run by local volunteers, are deeply traditional and often rely on the inspiration and dedication of individuals. This can result in museums that are repetitive and fossilised in time and do not appeal to modern audiences. This was the case for a LEADER programme in the District of Landshut in Bavaria, where eight local Heimat museums were seeking funding to support them. The paper explores the process and results of a community focused, consultative approach to enabling each of the museums to develop its own distinctive story within an overarching narrative, respecting the tradition of Heimat whilst appealing to new audiences.    

Title: Are environmental interpretation centres in Portugal prepared to fostering active citizenship?    
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation:    
First presenter: Pedro Morais    
Country: Portugal    
Organisation, Job Title: Ecotourism Consultant    
Co presenter    Jael Palhas    
Summary: Interpretation centres (IC) work as ‘non-formal schools’ for visitors and local populations. Their multifunctionality should meet the needs of different stakeholders and in the end produce major results in heritage awareness and protection.
A qualitative analysis of 86 environmental interpretation centres in Portugal identified several weaknesses such as: poor educational orientation, poor use of the environment potential, low employment of heritage interpretation concepts and a weak connection with local communities. The report expressed the need for a new vision on the design of IC to raise the participation of citizens and promote a better dissemination of natural and cultural heritage values in the entire community.
We shall present a case study (IC ‘Water school’) in Central Portugal to illustrate an initiative created to involve the local community, both in design and operation stages and where water can highlight several links between the heritage communities and the ecosystems.    


Title: Landscape and interpretation of heritage by local people
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation:
First presenter: Natallia Muryna
Country: Belarus
Organisation, Job Title: HERITAGE foundation 
Co presenter    
Summary: We shall describe the landscape and interpretation of its heritage by local people. The heritage of ‘Poozerie’ province –makes it a unique region of Belarus. The treasures of that part of our country should be interpreted and preserved as one of most important and most valued in Europe. 

Title: Historic personal interpretation in an urban outdoor setting: a case study from Brasov, Romania.    
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation    
First presenter: Florin Nechita    
Country: Romania    
Organisation, Job Title: Transilvania University of Brasov    
Co presenter    Simona Ciuraru (Cultour Association), Alin Mihai Puiu (Transilvania University of Brasov), Adina Nicoleta Candrea (Transilvania University of Brasov)    
Summary: This paper represents a case-study approach regarding historic personal interpretation in the city of Brasov in Romania, within the framework of a cultural project that brings back to life local historical characters. It aims to share local history in an interactive and creative way to both residents and tourists. The ‘History by the first person’ project has been organized since 2016 by the Cultour Association and co-financed by the Municipality of Brasov. The personal interpretation is delivered daily, during the summer time, in the main square of the city and other locations in the city through 10 historical figures, dressed as in the time when they lived. They cover about 500 years in our history, from the oldest character that lived in the 16th century, all the way to the beginning of the 20th century. They present their character's life stories, what they changed or brought into their community, as well as other helpful information about what to do or visit in the city.    


Title: The past and the future of the Roman military site of Călugăreni / Mikháza
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Szilamér-Péter Pánczél

Country: Romania
Organisation, Job Title: Mureș County Museum
Co presenter    Csongor Lukácsi, Koppány-Bulcsú Ötvös, Katalin Sidó and Orsolya Szilágyi 
Summary: Călugăreni/Mikháza (Eremitu / Nyárádremete municipality, Mureș County, Romania) is a traditional village in the Szeklerland. During antiquity, this region was part of the vast defensive system (limes, or frontier) of the Roman Empire, protecting the upper portion of the Niraj Valley and Dacia’s eastern frontier. 
Thanks to the collaboration between the museum, the local community and the local / regional authorities, the Călugăreni Archaeological Park was founded in 2015. The park (about 5ha in extent, covering 10% of the site), run by the museum, has the purpose of protecting and presenting the archaeological site. In the past few years two exhibition pavilions (Time Box), and a Bellevue (Compass) were built for this same purpose. Each year the museum organizes a Roman festival here with the active involvement of the local community.
 
Title: The art of sensing is(n't) hard to master: integrating (dis)ability in the museum gesamtwerk
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Jenny Anghelikie Papasotiriou

Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: Biologist, environmental management. Director and main shareholder of OikoM Ltd.
OikoM Ltd
Co presenter    
Summary: As the concept of universal design slips more and more into our worlds, separating norm from particularity, commonality from diversity and ability from disability seems no longer workable. In this workshop, we will build a range of mediation tools enabling museum staff and audiences to have deep and enriching experiences to which they can contribute themselves constructively. We will carve out a discursive space of co-creation, exchanging our abilities and building stronger inter-supportive communities that go beyond traditional separations between helper and disabled, guide and audience. We shall focus on descriptive methodologies intended to support visually impaired audiences and explore their usefulness for other conditions, while digging into the spontaneous expressiveness constructed through 'concentric monologues', investigating issues of intentionality, phenomenological reduction and its relevance in dealing with sensory disabilities as well as what we mean when we say 'I can'.

Title: ICOMOS ‘Our Common Dignity’ rights-based approaches guide in community-based heritage management
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Ave Paulus
Country: Estonia
Organisation, Job Title: ICOMOS International
Co presenter    Riin Alatalu
Summary: Since 2011, rights issues have been explored through the ‘Our-Common-Dignity Initiative’ by IUCN, ICCROM and ICOMOS. Workshop lecturers Ave and Riin will give an introduction to rights-based approaches, analyse some cases of heritage communities' substantial and procedural rights in Europe, offer standards for processes of participation and explain differences of duty-bearers and right-holders. The workshop will proceed with group work and a knowledge-exchange session. During the workshop we shall explore the range of tools and skills how to (1) build solid relationships with communities and peoples in heritage work; (2) embrace the principle of free, prior and informed consent of communities of origin before adopting measures related to their specific heritage; and (3) offer all possible assistance so that communities and other rights holders are consulted and invited to participate actively in the whole process of identification, interpretation, safeguarding, government and development of their heritage.

Title: Heritage interpretation and preservation: sacrificed at the altar of recreation?
Type of contribution: 55 min. presentation
First presenter: Pete Peterson
Country: USA
Organisation, Job Title: U.S. National Park Service
Co presenter    Steve Mark, Historian with the US National Park Service
Summary: The presentation will discuss how heritage resources and their preservation through well-meaning interpretation can be easily sacrificed to the ‘trinity’ of poor management and stakeholder decisions: 1) over use, 2) incompatible use and 3) thoughtless promotion. Highlighted examples and a facilitated discussion will provide the participant with the knowledge and skills to avoid this trinity and ensure management and stakeholder decisions at their heritage site create effective interpretation and preservation.
 
Title: Why fostering heritage communities is not a priority for the Greek state. 
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Argyri Platsa
Country: Italy
Organisation, Job Title: University of Campania: Luigi Vanvitelli 
Co presenter    Steve Mark, Historian with the U.S. National Park Service
Summary: The Paleochristian and Byzantine Monuments of Thessaloniki form a UNESCO World Heritage Site situated in the city centre of Thessaloniki, Greece. Consequently, the local community lives in close proximity to them. Moreover, most of the monuments (14 in total) are churches in use where religious ceremonies take place regularly and multiple worshippers participate. Consequently, one could hypothesise that the local community could be also actively participating in the management and interpretation of the site. However, the state's policy is based on a centralist model where the state is the exclusive manager and interpreter of cultural heritage excluding local communities from participation. Despite that, there is a number of cultural associations putting pressure on managing authorities. Finally, the Greek state has not signed the Faro convention that could overturn this situation. A possible cause for that could be concerns of power loss over the national narrative. 

Title: Ajapaik – 9 years of a crowdsourcing community and a platform for pictorial heritage
Type of contribution: 55 min. presentation
First presenter: Vahur Puik
Country: Estonia
Organisation, Job Title: Estonian Photographic Heritage Society 
Co presenter    
Summary: In 2011, a crowdsourcing platform Ajapaik.ee was created for enriching historic pictorial content with additional metadata. Although museum collections are being digitized and becoming accessible online, the search of content depends mostly only on textual descriptions that are language and era specific and that can often be too general or even erroneous.
In addition to harvesting invaluable information from wider audience we also foster the sense of ownership of our communal cultural heritage. 
Initially Ajapaik focused on pictures depicting places and asking users to geotag the images in order to create a map-based interface for searching cultural heritage. Next, we ask users to take contemporary repeat photos (or rephotos) of historic pictures resulting in then-and-now picture pairs. Over the years, hundreds of users have helped to geotag more than 106,000 pictures and add almost 16,000 rephotos.
We want to share our accumulated experience of developing the platform and community.

Title: Intangible cultural heritage and community empowerment: a case study from Pleternica, Croatia
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Dragana Lucija Ratkovic Aydemir
Country: Croatia
Organisation, Job Title: Muze d.o.o. / Muses Ltd Zagreb
Co presenter    
Summary: The town of Pleternica (population of 3,418, data from 2011) is located in Slavonia, the Eastern part of Croatia.
An entrepreneurial initiative for community empowerment and cohesion came from at a local level and people of Pleternica turned to their tradition and heritage as resources for their future growth and sustainability. A form of humorous folk song called ‘becharac’ from the region of Slavonia, included in the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage List, was taken as the framework for their plan to build a new museum of becharac. In this presentation we shall share how professional guidance in heritage interpretation and shared ownership of the local inhabitants can become the root tool for transformation, cohesion and revival of the community. 
 
Title: Letting go and looking out: activated heritage, activated communities, activated citizens 
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Annie Reilly
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: National Trust / Heritage Open Days
Co presenter    
Summary: If we want to unlock the potential of heritage to catalyse active citizenship and foster community, we have to move beyond visiting and beyond our borders. The world is in the grips of a seismic shift in power structures, with mass participation and peer coordination redefining how change happens and how we live. In this ‘new power’ world, heritage must re-consider its practice and values. Passive experiences, existing definitions, single perspectives and established ideas will be insufficient. How can we share power bravely, interrogate our hierarchies and build engagement with cultural heritage? Do we have the models, the assets and the mindset required? 
Drawing on examples from Heritage Open Days (England’s iteration of European Heritage Days) and the National Trust, this session will examine our working models and explore how we can work with and through others to foster active, dynamic and resilient heritage communities.

Title: Certified Interpretive Writer Course (IE training taster)
Type of contribution: 55 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Steven Richards-Price
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: Natural Resources Wales
Co presenter    Janja Sivec (Slovenia), Zsuzsa Tolnay (Hungary)
Summary: Written text that grabs the reader's attention, and holds it, is the key to effective word-based heritage interpretation. Try this Certified Interpretive Writer taster workshop for the course developed by Steven Richards-Price. It will give you a flavour, by taking part in a series of fun activities focused on the written word, of the hints, tips and techniques that will shape and improve your writing for visitors. The workshop is aimed at anyone keen on improving their writing for visitors. Keep an eye out for dates and locations of the full 5-day course for 2020!

Title: Interpreting heritage as usable knowledge and experience instead of possession.
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Dimitra Sidiropoulou
Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: Temporary contracts with the Greek Ministry of culture
Co presenter    
Summary: After the 1990s, the political and economic changes in Europe brought in the forefront the importance of differences among communities and enhancing their ethnocentrism. The profound mistake of such approaches is that heritage is conceived as a possession.
The asset of the Faro and Florence conventions is that the focus is on the future of communities.
Interpretation and interpretive training may have a great impact on heritage communities if they foster on perceiving heritage as knowledge, if they foster on the importance of networks of people where the expert will operate as a facilitator. In addition, it would be beneficial for the training, the inviting organization and the community related if each IE course (and its people, from within or outside the community) at the end offered a collective interpretive approach to the organization, as an example of constructing a communication channel and of gaining feedback for a variety of uses (for example, the design of sensorial communal maps). 

Title: Our heritage - capacity building workshops for heritage communities
Type of contribution: 1h 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Janja Sivec
Country: Slovenia
Organisation, Job Title: NGO Legends 
Co presenter    
Summary: Working a lot with communities in recent years, I have discovered that perception of our heritage is a very interesting and sometimes complicated thing. Do you know the sayings ‘in front of (one's) nose’ or ‘the grass is always greener elsewhere’? With the shift in tourism, and UNESCO Lists of Intangible Cultural Heritage, local heritage communities are getting more and more attention as the custodians of local traditions and keepers of their heritage. And to my personal satisfaction they are more and more aware of their roles.
In this workshop I will lead some of the activities that help local communities recognize and evaluate their heritage and spark ideas for the interpretation of their uniqueness. 

Title: A fun way to check visitors’ knowledge after visiting the interpretive centre
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Ales Smrekar
Country: Slovenia
Organisation, Job Title: ZRC SAZU, Anton Melik Geographical Institute
Co presenter    
Summary: The interpretive centre of karst vegetation in Sežana (Slovenia) presents the karst landscape to the visitors. In an interactive and didactic way is possible to learn about the natural and cultural heritage of this area. E-lessons are a modern electronic interpretation and fun tool that is an upgrade of the classical one. After enjoying the interpretation centre, visitors can check what they have remembered. On the big screen, they can choose between two e-lessons, for children or for youth and adults. Both e-lessons have 10 questions with different tools, such as puzzles, matching quizzes, memory, choosing from multiple answers and more. If visitors look at the centre carefully, they can find all the answers to the questions. Presented e-lessons are technically supported by Acex d.o.o.

Title: The Master’s House: how community interpretation helped to bring a historic building back to life
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Phil Songhurst
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: 
Co presenter    
Summary: For 600 years, the Master’s House in Ledbury, Herefordshire, has been at the heart of the community. It was originally a medieval hospital but by the beginning of this century, the building had fallen into disrepair. In 2012, Herefordshire Council began a major project to restore it as a heritage centre, library, archive and community resource area.
Imagemakers were commissioned to plan, design and deliver a wide-ranging interpretation scheme to tell the story of the building and its place in the town. Our brief was to involve the community as much as possible in this process. This presentation will explore how we engaged local people and schoolchildren in key tasks such as:
•    Content research
•    Copy and script writing 
•    Film production
•    Creating a digital tour
•    Photography and illustrations
•    Plays and performances
•    Becoming champions for the project
We shall share the lessons learned and how this project took on a life of its own to became a wonderful new focus for the community
Title: Digital training for heritage interpretation staff: experiences from the DELPHI-Project
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Martin Steber
Country: Germany
Organisation, Job Title: German Institute for Adult Education
Co presenter    
Summary: Can digitization create added value for the training of heritage interpretation staff? As part of the DELPHI project, a blended learning course is being developed that contributes to the professionalization of people working in heritage interpretation. The transfer of learning content into digital learning environments and the design of didactic patterns are not rocket science in themselves. The associated advantages are location and time-independent learning as well as the permanent availability of learning content and exercises. In addition, new forms of training can also be imagined. Virtual or augmented reality can create new approaches to investigating phenomena. Furthermore, the opportunity can also be used to make phenomena off-site tangible, even if this requires a different form of perception. The presentation reports on the experiences from the project and raises the question of a future perspective on the compatibility of digital media and heritage interpretation.


Title: Let's talk about heritage, the other way
Type of contribution: 55 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Valya Stergioti
Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: Interpret Europe
Co presenter    Vida Ungar
Summary: For years now, guided tours meant talking about facts, spreading information, and being the expert. Heritage interpretation brought a radical change: interpretive guides became facilitators instead of teachers. They now reveal the information that will provoke new ideas and different perspectives to those who listen, to encourage people to develop their own meaning of the phenomena presented. And they even include local communities when creating their talks. 
In this workshop, we shall explore the art of personal interpretation through exercises taken from IE's course for Certified Interpretive Guides – a 'must' for all those who want to become interpreters themselves.
 

Title: Planning for a world in transition: IE's course for Certified Interpretive Planners 
Type of contribution: 55 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Valya Stergioti
Country: Greece
Organisation, Job Title: Interpret Europe
Co presenter    Dragana Lucija Ratković Aydemir (Croatia), Michal Medek (Czech Republic)
Summary: For the last two years, IE has been developing a new course on interpretive planning [IP], where long standing principles of heritage interpretation (like Tilden’s reveal / relate / provoke) merge with newer theories (like the interpretive triangle, the four aces and the importance of local engagement) to give us a new outlook on it. In this workshop, we shall present some of the activities developed for this course and together we shall discuss about how such a course can address questions of today’s world.

Title: Heritage identities; heritage values; heritage futures
Type of contribution: 25 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Steven Timoney
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: University of the Highlands and Islands
Co presenter    
Summary: Inherent in the ‘need to put people and human values at the centre of an enlarged and cross-disciplinary concept of cultural heritage’ (Faro Convention) is the concept of value. But what value for heritage? Smith’s ‘authorised heritage discourse’ (AHD) (2006) challenge the very concept of heritage, presenting it as a way of seeing that is culturally constructed and legitimises certain practices of conservation and management. As such, interpreters have been part of this process of legitimising the AHD, creating these ‘guiding fictions’ (Pretes 2003).
The concept of polyvocality is not new, but facilitating public and community engagement that enables individuals to make sense of heritage for themselves is a continuing challenge. The role of interpreters is evolving, in part, from meaning-makers to meaning-facilitators, providing opportunities for different publics to make sense of heritage, to give it value and meaning, for themselves. The challenge is how to deliver this effectively. 

Title: Interpreting archaeological heritage through community involvement
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Nataša Urošević

Country: Croatia
Organisation, Job Title: Juraj Dobrila University of Pula, Croatia
Co presenter    Kristina Afrić Rakitovac, Nikola Vojnović
Summary: The presentation will elaborate the results of a research conducted within the project ArchaeoCulTour, which aimed to analyse models of valorisation of archaeological heritage in Istria, the most developed Croatian tourist region. The authors tested the key hypotheses through a local case study – the Municipality of Vrsar, a typical Mediterranean tourist destination, characterized by mass tourism and remarkable seasonality. Starting from the comparative analysis of the European best practice, the research included interviews with all interested stakeholders (local community, visitors, experts). Bearing in mind the local community’s commitment to sustainable development, the authors explored models of valorisation, presentation and interpretation of archaeological heritage, such as eco-archaeological parks, open-air museums and interpretation centres, living history programs and cultural routes, community digs and practical workshops as models of participatory heritage management.

Title: The new you: how to become an historical character for museums and heritage sites
Type of contribution: 55 min. interactive workshop
First presenter: Mark Wallis
Country: UK
Organisation, Job Title: Past Pleasures Ltd
Co presenter    Valya Stergioti (Greece)
Summary: This practical and enjoyable 55-minute workshop will look at the various skills needed to portray, convincingly, a person from the past and will cover such vital topics as the importance of research, correct costuming, engaging visitors, working with colleagues, presentational skills etc. 

Title: Accessibility of the natural and cultural heritage for disabled people in national parks of Poland
Type of contribution: 25 min. presentation
First presenter: Małgorzata Woźnicka
Country: Poland
Organisation, Job Title: Warsaw University of Life Sciences -SGGW
Co presenter    Emilia Janeczko
Summary: People with disabilities are full members of our society. Therefore, the linked natural and cultural heritage in Polish national parks should also be available to this social group. It should be noted, however, that this is a very diverse group in terms of requirements for adapting public space and not all aspects of accessibility are regulated by law. Barriers can result, for example, from differences in ground levels, too-high or too-low elements of the educational device or the lack of appropriate contrast. For people who are blind or intellectually disabled, the way of passing on knowledge and choosing the right words are important. Also important is the properly formulated information on the availability of individual national parks which appears on their websites.

 

 

[unex_ce_button id="content_hccszhz2w,column_content_5bn4525y6" button_text_color="#ffffff" button_font="bold" button_font_size="18px" button_width="full_width" button_alignment="center" button_text_spacing="1px" button_bg_color="#3c526d" button_padding="15px 60px 15px 60px" button_border_width="0px" button_border_color="#3c526d" button_border_radius="0px" button_text_hover_color="#ffffff" button_text_spacing_hover="1px" button_bg_hover_color="#f0972c" button_border_hover_color="#f0972c" button_link="/programmeoutline/" button_link_type="url" button_link_target="_self" has_container="" in_column="1"]Programme outline[/ce_button]
[unex_ce_button id="content_hccszhz2w,column_content_gxept0geu" button_text_color="#ffffff" button_font="bold" button_font_size="18px" button_width="full_width" button_alignment="center" button_text_spacing="1px" button_bg_color="#3c526d" button_padding="15px 60px 15px 60px" button_border_width="0px" button_border_color="#3c526d" button_border_radius="0px" button_text_hover_color="#ffffff" button_text_spacing_hover="1px" button_bg_hover_color="#f0972c" button_border_hover_color="#f0972c" button_link="/keynote-speakers" button_link_type="url" button_link_target="_self" has_container="" in_column="1"]Keynote speakers[/ce_button]
[unex_ce_button id="content_hccszhz2w,column_content_wzzvl9jul" button_text_color="#ffffff" button_font="bold" button_font_size="18px" button_width="full_width" button_alignment="center" button_text_spacing="1px" button_bg_color="#3c526d" button_padding="15px 60px 15px 60px" button_border_width="0px" button_border_color="#3c526d" button_border_radius="0px" button_text_hover_color="#ffffff" button_text_spacing_hover="1px" button_bg_hover_color="#f0972c" button_border_hover_color="#f0972c" button_link="/workshops-and-presentations" button_link_type="url" button_link_target="_blank" has_container="" in_column="1"]Workshops and presentations[/ce_button]
Programme-downProgramme-down